Do we need more technology in Schools? A luddites view

August 24, 2007

[technologies] have nothing whatever to do with the fundamental problems we have to solve in schooling our young. If I do harbor any hostility toward these machines, it is only because they are distractions. They divert the intelligence and energy of talented people from addressing the issues we need most to confront.

 I agree the main problems we should all face in education are with its fundamental aims and we shouldn’t allow ourselves to get to distracted by technology that doesn’t really allow us to do anything we couldn’t do before.  I’d really like to hear peoples opinions on this so please comment.

TECHNOS QUARTERLY Winter 1993 Vol. 2 No. 4

Of Luddites, Learning, and Life

By Neil Postman

“I would bar educators from talking about technical improvements until they have disclosed their reasons for offering an education in the first place.” So wrote Neil Postman in his cautionary tale, “Deus Machina,” in the Winter 1992 issue of TECHNOS. Here he takes his challenge one step further, to those who say that new technologies will soon make schools extinct. They have it all wrong, Postman says, because they don’t understand the real purpose of schools.

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Kohn puts Supernanny in the Naughty Corner

August 14, 2007

I really admire Alfie Kohns work and advise everyone to take a look at “What does it mean to be well educated.”

In the following article he describes the parenting mistakes made in the television show supernanny which is teaching thousands of parents across the world how to raise children (I know its been screeened in the UK, US andBrazil).  For more of his work online see his website.

One of his arguments I found especially interesting was the fact that supernanny never considers wider issues.  In a recent UN survey the UK was found to be one of the worst places to raise children and I think Chomsky does a good job of describing why that is –

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George Carlin: education and the owners of America

August 8, 2007

“It’s called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

A comedian who believes state education was set up to benefit the state and business as a means of social control and thought control. Teaching discipline and respect for authority. I’ve heard a number of educators talk of this, was a bit skeptical so I got a book on education policy (second hand from Oxfam). It was from the 80’s and I didn’t have to read to far to find that its true “the orientation of policy making is now towards the consumers of education – the parents and industrialists, the producer lobbies [teachers] are almost totally excluded” (1). Notice consumers of education are not children, children are the material to be worked on. For more on this I recommend John Taylor Gatto.

[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMqJvhmD5Yg]

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