Journals: Open Access and RSS

 

Last month five leading European research institutions launched a petition that called on the European Commission to establish a new policy that would require all government-funded research to be made available to the public shortly after publication.

In response, the European Commission committed more than $100m (£51m) towards facilitating greater open access through support for open access journals and for the building of the infrastructure needed to house institutional repositories that can store the millions of academic articles written each year.

The European developments demonstrate the growing global demand for open access, a trend that is forcing researchers, publishers, universities, and funding agencies to reconsider their role in the creation and dissemination of knowledge.

That requirement – called an open access principle – would leverage widespread internet connectivity with low-cost electronic publication to create a freely available virtual scientific library available to the entire globe.

Given the connection between research and economic prosperity, the time has come for governments, their funding agencies, and the international research community to maximise the public’s investment in research by prioritising open access.

BBC NEWS | Technology | Push for open access to research

After reading these BBC article on Open Access Journals I am convinced that they all should be and as a consequence signed the petition.  I think if all Universities made all research available to everyone for free, we would take a large step toward the betterment of all mankind.  Also many of the fee paying journal sites are failing to grasp the nature of the internet.  Many times I’ve been frustrated with the prospect of a great article only to find I’d need to pay a fee.  Aside from anything else, I’m not sure how these fee paying journals will compete.  MIT’s open access program has shown that it can be beneficial to offer your information and work for free, and I hope all Universities will follow.

I’ve passed the link onto a few friends who are still at University.  Although they were not that interested when I first explained it to them, they came back to me later raving at how useful the open access journals were.  They found that although the University offered them free access to fee paying journals, they were not a source they could use from home where they did much of their research and studying.

Links

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2 Responses to Journals: Open Access and RSS

  1. Your posting conflates somewhat the two roads to Open Access (OA): The Gold Road of publishing in OA journals and the Green Road of publishing in conventional journals but also self-archiving the article in the author’s OA Institutional Repository.

    Your posting also only includes links for Gold OA, and not for Green OA. Here are three (one for the OA self-archiving FAQ, one for the Registry of Open Access Repositories (ROAR) and one for the Registry of Open Access Repository policies of research institutions and funders:
    http://www.eprints.org/self-faq/
    http://roar.eprints.org/
    http://www.eprints.org/signup/fulllist.php

    Stevan Harnad
    http://amsci-forum.amsci.org/archives/American-Scientist-Open-Access-Forum.html

  2. Tartan says:

    Hey Stevan, thanks for the links! I found another article on your forum that Ive had a quick look over that I think might be very interesting.

    Tragic loss or good riddance? The impending demise of traditional scholarly journals
    http://www.jucs.org/jucs_0_0/tragic_loss_or_good/Odlyzko_A.pdf

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